FREE: 12×12 Bullet Journal Printable.

I’m wrapping up my third year as a member of the 12×12 picture book writing challenge – the yearly challenge to write 12 picture book manuscripts in a year. 2018 is my second year winning 12×12 (i.e. writing 12 picture book manuscripts in a year).

I gotta say, 12x12ers are some of the best people on the planet. Their support has been invaluable.

So while I’m busy prepping for bullet journal for next year, I thought I’d give a little something back.

Last year I shared this spread from my bullet journal:

 

This year I’ve gone one step further by making a printable version you can download. You can print it out to use on its own, or cut and paste into a bullet journal.

12x12 Bullet Journal Spread

Each month, jot down the names of the manuscripts you write and revise. Add in the webinars you watch and (if you’re going for gold) the submissions you make.

There’s not much more satisfying than seeing this all filled in at the end of the year.

 

Get the 12×12 Bullet Journal Spread

 

You might also like:

Free Printable Bullet Journal for Writers  Bullet Journaling for Writers: Part 1 The Basics

 

Bullet Journaling For Writers: Part 1 The Basics

Bullet Journaling for Writers: Part 1 The Basics

I’m a bullet journal and planning junkie. Working out the exact right system for maximum joy and productivity is 1000% my jam.

Over the last few years, I’ve worked out a system that helps me make the most of my writing time, keep track of multiple projects, and meet my goals.

Today I’m really excited to launch a blog series on Bullet journaling for writers. Read this blog series to learn my (not so) secret system for organizing your writing life to reduce stress and maximize joy.

Not only that, you can get a printable version for free when you sign up for my mailing list. 

Free Printable Bullet Journal for Writers

Today I’m going to take you for a tour through my bullet journal.

In later posts, I will take you through my magical monthly spread and share ideas for collections for every writer’s bullet journal.

I hope this peek into my bullet journal helps you find more writing joy in your writing life.

 

Stack of My Writing Bullet Journals
My Writing Bullet journals. From top to bottom: Dark Teal 2018 writing Bullet journal, Silver 2019 Writing Bullet Journal, Turquoise Novel Bullet Journal, Purple New Novel Bullet Journal

 

What is Bullet Journaling?

First off, if you don’t know what bullet journaling is, you should hop over to the official Bullet Journal website and watch the introductory video. I’ll wait.

Back? Great.

The thing about bullet journaling is that it’s not just about the journal. The magic is in the process.

  • As you create the journal you’re reflecting on the tasks you want to accomplish =  setting goals and make plans accordingly.
  • Afterward, you analyze the un-done tasks and unmet goals before making new plans =  reevaluating your goals and resetting your intentions.

It’s a process with goal-setting and intentionality built in that just so happens to fit in a notebook.

Once you get the basics down, you can customize it to your heart’s desire. Your bullet journal will not be exactly like mine, because you don’t work in exactly the same way I do.

 

My Bullet Journal

You can start a bullet journal any time and keep going until it’s full. I prefer to set up one for each year. I’ve been doing this for a few years, so I know that one journal is just about right for a year.

For 2019, I’m using a Silver Rhodia goal book. It has good quality paper (which I need for fountain pens) and it has some pages pre-formatted in useful ways.

My 2019 Writing Bullet Journal with a few of my favorite tools
My 2019 Writing Bullet Journal with a few of my favorite tools

 

It’s looking great – crisp and untarnished by, you know, actual use. Great for inspiration but empty pages don’t really show you how to use a journal.

So I’m also going to share some pictures from my 2018 journal – a softcover Moleskin. This one has that lived-in look that I’ve come to cherish. Which is to say, it’s messy. No matter how good my intentions, at some point I get a bit slapdash. So don’t despair if your journal isn’t a work of art like the ones you see on Instagram – I’m right there with you.

 

Index

The first thing you need is an index. You’ll be adding things to your bullet journal over time. When you do, put an entry in the index with the page number so you can easily find the entry later.

2019 Writing Bullet Journal - Index
2019 Writing Bullet Journal – Index Looking a Little Empty

My 2019 journal already comes with pages formatted for a table of contents and all the pages numbered.

Previously I set aside a few pages for the index and numbered the pages by hand. It’s tedious, but not hard.

2018 Writing Bullet Journal - Index
2018 Writing Bullet Journal – Index full from a year of use

 

Collections

A collection is simply a two-page spread of information you want to keep together. Find a blank page and list all the information together.

Here’s one from my 2019 Bullet Journal. I try to blog on the first and fifteenth of each month. In my 2019 writing bullet journal, I went to the next open page (26) and made a collection to hold all the information about blog posts. I noted that in the index.

2019 Writing Bullet Journal - Blogging Collection
2019 Writing Bullet Journal – Blogging Collection

It’s looking a little empty right now, but it will fill up through the year as I jot down ideas and track what I post.

There are a ton of collections that can be useful for writers. I have another blog post with collection ideas for writers. Make sure to hop over and check that out.

 

Future Log

The future log is a special kind of collection. It’s a place to track future events and tasks.

2019 Writing Bullet Journal - Future Log
2019 Writing Bullet Journal – Future Log

Last year, I didn’t really use a future log. My Rhodia has these pages preformatted with the months, so I’m going try using them as a future log this year. You can see I’ve already jotted down some deadlines and tasks for January and February.

 

Calendex

I discovered this last year and it. is. brilliant. It’s a combination of a calendar and an index. The Calendex originated here and this post has a really nice overview.

2019 Writing Bullet Journal - Calendex
2019 Writing Bullet Journal – Calendex

The Rhodia comes with spreads I can use for this. Previously I drew it out by hand.

 

2018 Writing Bullet Journal - Calendex
2018 Writing Bullet Journal – Calendex

SETTING UP A CALENDEX: Each column represents a month. Each row represents a day. I drew lines across to show breaks between weeks. (I use a Monday-Sunday week for planning so the weekend isn’t split up.)

USING THE CALENDEX:  Earlier I showed you the collection I made for Blogging information on page 26.

In my Calendex, I wrote in the page number (26) on the first and fifteenth of each month.

2019 Writing Bullet Journal - Calendex
2019 Writing Bullet Journal – Calendex

Now when I look at the calendex, I can instantly see that I’ve got a deadline that day (like a calendar) and I can easily trace it back to all the relevant information on page 26 (like an index).

Brilliant.

You can make this even more useful with color coding. I use green to signify critique group meetings and deadlines, blue for writing deadlines (like blog posts), red for writing challenges, and purple for events. The little stars indicate holidays, birthdays, and the like.

USING THE CALENDEX FOR PLANNING: I love the Calendex because I can instantly see how busy I’m going to be. For instance, in January 2019 I can see that I’ll be working on writing new books for the Little Elephant’s series all month long. I also have a writing challenge I want to participate in. It’s looking busy already and I don’t even have any of my critique group meetings listed yet. (I’m in 3 critique groups. It’s a lot.)

This is useful for planning: I know January is not the month to start writing that new novel or to take on more contract work.

 

Monthly Log

My monthly log is by far the most important piece for keeping me organized. I’m dedicating a whole blog post to this one. So make sure you check that out. I’ll give you a taste of it here.

In a traditional Monthly log, at the beginning of the month, you would make a spread for the month. Copy over all upcoming events and tasks for the month from your future log. Then add anything else you need to get done for the month.

My December 2018 Monthly log
My December 2018 Monthly log

MY MONTHLY SPREAD: Over time, I’ve devised my own monthly spread for my writing bullet journal. It’s designed to meet my needs:

  • I needed a system to keep track of a variety of writing tasks: writing, craft development, business and marketing, submissions, etc.
  • I needed a way to manage multiple manuscripts at the same time.

The whole thing serves as a dashboard – a place to gather the most important information so I can tell, at a glance, what my priorities are and what tasks I need to accomplish to meet my goals.

 

Daily (ish) Logs

Daily log from December 2018
Daily log from December 2018

The daily log is your list of events and tasks for the day. Though you can get fancy, mine is essentially a to-do list. After writing it out, I sometimes number them by priority.

It’s daily-ish because I don’t write one out every day. In a few days when the list is no longer relevant, I make a new one.

 

Putting it Together

Those are all the basic components of a Bullet Journal. You’ll find all of them in my free Bullet Journaling for Writers Printable.

Make sure to read my next post on my custom monthly logging system to learn more.

FREE: Printable Bullet Journal Inserts for Writers

Free Printable Bullet Journal for Writers

2018 has been a great year for me – for starters, I published my second board book: I Pray Today!

I’ve been wanting to share a little love for all the writers who have helped me along in this journey. So today I’m sharing a free printable version of my Bullet Journal spreads.

I’ve developed this system over time to help me meet my goals with more joy and less stress. 

Getting it is easy: sign up for my mailing list, and I’ll send it along as my way of saying THANK YOU!

 

GET THE PRINTABLE

 

BIG List of Books for Kids: 2018 edition

2018 List of Books to give to kids: Kids books for every age and stage: Baby to Teen and everything in between

It’s that time of year again: where I try to convince you to buy books for every child you know this holiday season.

This is my fourth year putting together this list (!!!). It’s always a lot of fun to look back at what I read over the year – like revisiting old friends. I hope you will find some new friends on this list.

I’ve added some codes to help identify particular types of books:

NF = Nonfiction

H = Humor

Memoir

S = Series

 

And if you somehow don’t find a book on this list, check out the extra lists at the bottom of the post.

 

Babies and Toddlers

(Board books: Babies and toddlers)

I Pray Today book cover artBook Cover: Ciao, Baby! In the Park   Book Cover: Wee Beasties: Huggy the Python Hugs Too Hard

I Pray Today and Goodnight Jesus (You knew this was coming, right?)

Ciao, Baby! In the Park

Wee Beasties: Huggy the Python Hugs Too Hard (This series is great for toddlers)

See also: Roundup of 12 board Books

 

Child

(Picture Book: Age 3-8)

Book Cover: All are WelcomeBook Cover: Are we pears yet?Book Cover: Be KindBook Cover: The Day you Begin

All Are Welcome

Are We Pears Yet? NF H

Be Kind

The Day You Begin

 

Book Cover: the Diamond and the BoyBook Cover: EscargotBook Cover: The FieldBook Cover: Starring Carmen

The Diamond and the Boy: The Creation of Diamonds and the Life of H. Tracy Hall NF

Escargot H

The Field

Starring Carmen H

Book Cover: This is not a normal animal bookBook cover: We Don't Eat Our Classmatesbook Cover: When Penny Met POTUS

This is Not a Normal Animal Book H

We Don’t Eat Our Classmates H

When Penny Met Potus H

 

New Readers

(Early Readers: Age 6-9)

Book Cover: Super Happy Party Bears 1: Gnawing AroundBook Cover: Two Dogs in a Trench Coat Go to School

Super Happy Party Bears H S

Two Dogs in a Trench Coat Go to School H S

 

 

Graphic Novels

(Age 3-99, younger children will need an adult reader)

This July I did a round-up of these 6 great graphic novels. Check out the post for a full description of each book and find out why I think graphic novels should be a part of a child’s balanced reading diet.

Book Cover: Catstronauts: Mission MoonBook Cover: El DeafoBook Cover: Ghostsbook Cover: Phoebe and her Unicorn

Catsotronauts H S

El Deafo Memoir H

Ghosts

Phoebe and Her Unicorn H S

 

Book Cover: Real FriendsBook Cover: Zita the Spacegirl

Real Friends Memoir

Zita the Spacegirl H S

 

Tweens

(Middle Grade: Age 8-12)

Book Cover: Amal UnboundBook Cover: Counting by 7sBook Cover: Lockwood and Company Book 1: The Screaming StaircaseBook Cover: The Miscalculations of Lightning Girl

Amal Unbound

Counting by 7’s

Lockwood and Company: The Screaming Staircase S (Note: this book is sometimes classed as Young Adult but, besides some creepy ghosts, does not contain mature content that would be inappropriate for tweens.)

The Miscalculations of Lightning Girl

 

Book Cover: The Parker InheritanceBook Cover: Shark LadyBook Cover: The World's Latest DetectiveBook Cover: York: The Shadow Cipher

The Parker Inheritance

Shark Lady: The True Story of How Eugenie Clark Became the Ocean’s Most Fearless Scientist NF

The World’s Greatest Detective

York: The Shadow Cipher S

 

Teens

(Young Adult: Age 13+)

Note that these books have mature content (roughly equivalent to PG13). This post gives tips for determining if a book is appropriate for your child.

Book Cover: The Astonishing Color of AfterBook Cover: The Poet XBook Cover: Turtles all the way down

The Astonishing Color of After

The Poet X

Turtles All the Way Down

 


Need more ideas? Check out these:

 2016 Big List of Books to Give to Kids

Big list of books to give to kids

200+ Children's Book Reviews

 

20+ Gifts for Young Writers

20+ gifts for young writers

Juliann Caveny headshotA month ago, a friend asked for suggestions of gifts for her young writer. I immediately knew that fellow Illinois flatlander Juliann Caveny was the perfect person to write this post.

I first met Juli at the 2017 SCBWI Illinois Words in the Woods retreat. Juli has a warm and vivacious personality that oozes out onto her manuscript pages. Juli writes for children of all ages, from preschoolers to young adults, and has a soft spot for quiet, yet powerful stories about friendship and family.

She’s also a passionate teacher with a knack for nurturing budding writers. (True fact: while talking with her, I mentally catalog ideas to use with my own kids.) She also makes an impressive Du Iz Tak costume.

You can read Juli’s full bio on her agent’s webpage here and check out Juli’s blog here. Or connect with her on Facebook, Instagram, or Twitter.

Lucky for all of us, Julie agreed to write this post. (I didn’t even have to twist her arm!) Take it away Juli!


20 Gifts for Young Writers

@julicaveny

I have been writing since I was six. That year, for Christmas, I was given my first diary. It wasn’t much later that I “published” my first book. (I typed the entire draft using a Brother portable and recycled dot-matrix printer paper, illustrated each page by hand and used leftover scraps of yarn to bind the book. It was beautiful.)

While some of the tools of the trade have changed since I was young, many have not.

Writers of all ages still get excited with a new package of pens, a clean, ready-to-be-written-in notebook, and the perfect, quiet corner. As a teacher and a mom of three, I’ve supplied many budding authors with practical, fun and inspiring presents. Luck for us, the rest of the world has caught on to our obsession and now there are tons of great gift options for writers, young to old.

These are a few of my favorites. I hope these ideas inspire you to find the perfect gift for the young author (or adult author) on your list this season!

 

Gifts for Where a Writer Writes

Idea board - framed, fabric board with crisscrossed ribbons to hold pictures, etc. in place.Lightbox with the words "Everything Lightbox Mini"Pillow with lines to look like writing paper

1. Inspiration/Idea Boards – When I was growing up, my parents installed a full-wall of cork-board. I was able to put anything I wanted on that wall and rearrange it without causing damage. Idea boards are important to writers and illustrators. No matter how big or small, give your young author a space to create.

2. Do Not Disturb Sign/Light Box – If you want to avoid having your child write in pen on their door, get them a sign!

3. Pillows/Comforter – Sweet Dreams! This is a gift that we’ve actually DIYed. (Don’t forget to check out the comforter as a set!)

 

Gifts for the Writer on the Go

Noise canceling headphone with a black and purple galaxy pattern on ear pieces

4.  Noise Canceling Headphones—All my NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) student writers have great headphones. It’s a must-have for working in busy spaces or in the car. These are some cute ones, but if you want to look around, make sure the noise canceling rating is on the high end… 20-30dB.

5. Small Backpack—I really like personalized gifts for writers. Make sure any bag or backpack you get for a writer fits their needs—i.e. Do you need room for a laptop? Or notebooks?

6. A Reusable Water Bottle – Authors “in the zone” tend to forget about food and drink. Don’t let your young writer go thirsty!

7. A sturdy and fun Pen/Pencil Pouch – A MUST HAVE! When I’m traveling, I don’t want to have to rely on the pen that was left in the council. My favorites are always kept in a special pouch.

 

Gifts for What a Writer Wears

 

Mary jane-type shoes - one decorated to look like white notebook paper, the other decorated like the cover of a black and white composition notebookCustom printed socksPeter pan infinity scarf

8. Fun Shoes – There’s the DIY– and then there’s these fancy treats from Hot Chocolate. (They come in small girls’ sizes and adult sizes too!)

9. Personalized Socks A friend bought me some personalized socks. Add your kiddo’s favorite book quote, or simply have WRITER AT WORK emblazed on the backs!

10. Scarf/GlovesMore for the teen writer and lover of classics, but you can also check out their selection of headbands and totes!

Brightly colored stocking capJuli Caveny in her thinking cap

11. “Thinking” Cap – Caps and hats are always popular with kid writers. (Often I catch my students with their hoodies over their heads as they are tucked in a corner, writing.) I call mine my “thinking cap” and add buttons and details along the way. Look for unique words, phrases or pins to add. Find this one at Kohl’s.

 

Gifts for What a Writer Needs (Old-School)

black typewriterPersonalized notebook: teal background, image of a unicorn in a jar with the text "The fantastical imaginings of Lila Rook"Diary with a lock: cover design shows chains and the words "Do Not Enter"

12. TypewriterBring back the thrill of the click-click on a no-tech “qwerty” keyboard. Another way to have the same feel, for a much cheaper price is to try a used AlphaSmart. These were used in schools (before the iPad) and are great for on-the-go. They are battery operated, store up to twelve drafts and convert easily to a word-processing document with the adaptor.

13. Personalized Notebooks and Pens/Pencils—Again, you can’t go wrong with personalized gifts for a writer.

14. A Diary (with LOCK!)This is the place where all the ideas are born. (Ask Jack Gantos!) It’s from the little notes that an author builds those big stories. Give your kiddos a private place to start writing.

 

What a Writer Needs (New-School/Low-Tech)

Doodle boardRocket reusable notebookScuba Notes

15. Doodle Boards – The perfect spot for the young writer or illustrator that needs to write on everything! There’s no ink, so no mess!

16. Rocket Reusable NotebooksA “new” tech way of writing. These reusable notebooks, combined with a free app, create a digital space for all your notes and writing.

17. Scuba Notes (Glow in the Dark) For the writer who needs to write in the bathtub… and at night.

 

Story Starters and Inspiration

Clear jarBook Cover for "The Word Collector" by Peter ReynoldsRory Story Cubes

18. Word Collection Jars. Peter Reynold’s book, The Word Collector, embodies everything a writer loves. Why not give your young author a jar to collect those words in? Just add the words on little slips of paper and let the writing begin!

19. Rory’s Story Cubes—My students and I love these! The cubes can be used on your own, or as a game. Either way, the sets and creating stories with them can be addictive.

20. Story Starter Books and Blank Books—Everyone loves a good story starter. These are a few great ideas to get your writer started!

Book Cover: 642 Things to Write About: Young Writer Edition Book cover: Blank Comic Book for kids Book cover: And Then: Story Starters: 20 Imaginative Beginnings

 

20+ gifts for young writers

 

Prairie Writers and Illustrator’s Day 2018

There are a lot of reasons to go to writers conferences. The obvious one is that you learn a ton and it always reinvigorates me. After the day is over I’m itching to get back to writing.

 

It’s also great for networking. When I went to my first Society of Childrens Book Writers and Illustrator’s (SCBWI) conference in 2015, I knew almost no one. This year, it felt like I couldn’t go anywhere without running into someone I have a connection with: people from my local SCBWI region, new friends I’ve made at other conferences, writers I know from online forums, and fellow volunteers for KidlitNation.

And this brings me to another major benefit. Yes, it’s useful to know people in the industry. These are people who can help spread word of mouth about my books or help connect me with work contacts. But even more importantly, these are my friends and community.

Writing can seem like a really lonely endeavor – sitting alone at a computer typing away. That’s definitely some of it, but in the digital age, we also connect over the internet. We find support, camaraderie, and friendships with like-minded writers around the country and around the world. I’m so thankful that the internet is able to bring us together, but there’s an extra joy in getting to see people face to face.

This introverts cup was full to overflowing this weekend. Now I’m ready to hide back in my office and get some writing done.

Announcement: Free Webinar this Wednesday!

Free Webinar with Angela Isaacs on Wed. Oct. 17 at 7pm

This Wednesday, I’m doing a free webinar with Kidlit Nation. I’ll be sharing my experience of working with a small publishing house.

If you’re a writer trying to break into the kidlit market, small publishers are a great place to start. I’m also currently writing my third set of work for hire picture books – another great starting place. Tune in to find out about my journey and how you can get started.

Not a writer, but curious how a book gets made? Or what it’s like being a writer? Come and find out!

There will be time for me to answer questions, so now’s the time to get your burning questions answered.

Registering is easy: just head to the website and click the big blue button to register.

If you’re not familiar with KidlitNation, they’re a nonprofit that works to make the children’s book industry more accessible to people of color. Right now the focus is on education – free webinars and scholarships to professional conferences – but they have big plans for the future.

I’ve been working with them for over a year and they are dedicated, passionate, and all-around awesome. Consider donating a few bucks (any amount helps!) or volunteering a bit of your time.

 

Announcement: Visiting Scholar and October Author Visits

I don’t know about you, but September was a whirlwind!

October is looking to be just as chaotically and beautifully busy. I’ve got a full load of travel and speaking engagements this month.

This week I’ll be at Purdue University as a visiting scholar! I’m leading workshops for a picture book writing class and giving a public talk:

Screenshot of Purdue talk description. Title: A Peek Inside the Children's Book Industry

I’m looking forward to being back in the classroom. Better yet, I get to talk about kidlit for nearly a whole week!

The only thing better than talking about kidlit, is sharing my books with real kids. I’m also working on scheduling author visits to parishes in Louisville, Kentucky, and Chicago, Illinois. Check back for details!

If you’re interested in having me visit your parish or class, contact me to find out details.

 

12 Books for Babies and Toddlers and Why They Work

12 Books for Babies and Toddlers and Why They Work

Earlier this month, I Pray Today, my second book for babies and toddler was published. Today is the last day of the blog tour to celebrate.

I’ve been working on book reviews all year, though. Each month I gather up a few books I love and share them with my readers. I call it Kidlit Karma. This month I’m sharing some of my favorite books for babies and toddlers. I’m also going to dive into child development to explain why these books work.

 

Simple Art

Babies can’t see that well. Newborns’ vision is hazy – they like high contrast because it’s easy to see. You’ll often find the youngest babies staring at, say, a black object against a white background. Or a dark ceiling fan moving against a white ceiling.

By a few months old, babies vision has improved a lot but they often have a hard time understanding 2-D representations of objects.

So, books for babies and toddler often have high-contrast, easy-to-interpret pictures. For the youngest, single images on white backgrounds can be a good choice.

Book cover: RhymOceros

Rhymoceros by Janik Coat

 

Even for toddlers, simple graphics are easier for them to understand.

Book Cover: Wee Beasties: Huggy the Python Hugs Too Hard

Wee Beasties: Huggy the Python Hugs Too Hard by Ame Dyckman and Alex Griffiths

 

Faces Are a Fave

Babies love faces for pretty much the same reasons we adults do: they give us a lot of important information. We look at a person’s face to identify them and to tell what that person is feeling. Watching someone’s face while they talk also helps us figure out what they are saying. For babies who are still learning speech, it’s doubly helpful. That’s probably why babies are hardwired to stare at faces.

So books with lots of faces are a winner, especially with the younger babies and toddlers.

Book Cover: Making Faces: A First Book of Emotion

Making Faces: A First Book of Emotions

 

Babytalk and Rhyming Books

Babies love “baby talk” and it’s good for them. Forget what Great Aunt Bertha told you about only talking to your baby like a grown-up. Baby talk exaggerates the sounds of speech which makes it easier for babies to figure out the sounds they’re hearing and put those together into words. So go ahead and talk to babies in whatever way feels natural to you.

The sing-songy cadence of many rhyming books, help capitalize on this tendency. (Writers: be aware that babies are not less discerning than adults. If you write in rhyme, it needs to have PERFECT rhyme and meter.)

Book Cover: Moo Baa La La La

Moo, Baa, La La La! by Sandra Boynton

 

Repetition

Babies love repetition. They drop the same toy over and over to see if dad will still pick it up, they never tire of peekaboo, and they will gladly have you read the same book over and over and over. While at times it’s infuriating (like the 5th time the bowl of oatmeal gets dropped to the floor), it has an important purpose: babies and toddlers learn best through repetition.  Like little scientists, they’re testing if the oatmeal really drops every time. They’re also learning social information: “Will dad pick it up every time?” “Why is his mood changing as I keep dropping this?”

So many books use some kind of repetition: like the repeated phrase “Ciao!”

Book Cover: Ciao, Baby! In the Park

Ciao, Baby! In the Park by Carole Lexa Shaefer and Lauren Tobia

Or a repeated action like “besos.” (Kisses.)

Book Cover: Besos for Baby a Little Book of Kisses

Besos for Baby: A Little Book of Kisses by Jen Arena and Blanca Gomez

 

Toddlers Need to Move

Speaking of actions, getting a toddler to sit still is a lost cause. They’re busy little beings. It’s easy to read with an immobile baby – harder to keep a toddler still and focused. So many books for toddlers include some kind invitation to action to help keep them engaged with the book. 

That could be an action built right into the page, such as lifting a flap or holes designed for little fingers to poke into.

Book cover: Do Cows Meow?

Do Cows Meow? by Salina Yoon

Or it could be an invitation to action: mentioning movement is a natural invitation to move.

Book cover: Barnyard Dance!

Barnyard Dance! by Sandra Boynton

 

Sturdy Pages and Rounded Corners

Babies will put pretty much everything into their mouth. It’s a way for them to explore the world by adding the sense of taste and touch (lips and tongues are very sensitive).

Babies and toddlers are also still working on fine motor skills – such as the ability to grasp and flip a book page without tearing. They need to explore the world and practice these fine motor skills – but it can be murder on a book.

So most baby and toddler books are board books – those chunky cardboard-style book pages that can withstand chewing, banging, other forms of baby love. They even have rounded corners to prevent an eye or mouth from being poked.

Photo of book: Goodnight Jesus with corner chewed off by toddler
Photo courtesy of Summer Kinard at https://summerkinard.com/2016/11/02/goodnight-jesus-board-book-review/

 

Adults Have to Like Them Too

Since your baby will be asking to reread the same book 10,000 times (and they will), books also have to please the adult doing the reading. A newer trend is to write book series’ that focus on topics of interest to a parent (like science, great literature, etc.), but at a level simplistic enough for a baby. No, your toddler won’t be doing astrophysics calculations in their crib. They’re in it for the baby faces and birdies, but the parent can appreciate the science.

Book Cover: Baby Loves Aerospace Engineering

Baby Loves Aerospace Engineering by Ruth Spiro

Book Cover: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz: A Babylit Colors Primer

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz: A Babylit Colors Primer by Jennifer Adams and Alison Oliver

Putting It All Together

Most books will have a few of these features. Take my two books, Goodnight Jesus and I Pray Today.

Book Cover: Goodnight Jesus

Goodnight Jesus has:

  • beautiful, but simple art
  • faces on nearly every page (yay, icons!)
  • sing-songy rhymes
  • a repeated action (kissing) that little readers can do
  • sturdy pages

Book Cover: I Pray Today

I Pray Today has:

  • beautiful, simple art
  • faces on every page
  • sing-songy rhymes
  • a repeated phrase (Lord have mercy.)
  • which can be an invitation to a repeated action (saying the prayer and making a cross)
  • sturdy pages

And like a baby book on astrophysics, both of mine have bigger ideas at their core. That gives them a long lifespan for little readers and makes it interesting for the adult readers.


I hope you’ve enjoyed this week’s book tour! I’ve had fun writing on a lot of different topics on a lot of different blogs. If you missed them, you can still find them here:

Blog tour for "I PRAY TODAY"

 

I PRAY TODAY Blog Tour Day 4

Blog tour for "I PRAY TODAY"

It’s day 4 of my blog tour! If you haven’t already, check out the Day 1 post at Raising Saints, the Day 2 post on Orthodox Motherhood, and the Day 3 post on the Time Eternal blog.

Today I’m over on Charlotte Riggle’s blog talking about using children’s books for teaching kids. Check it out:

 

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