Category: reading

12 Books for Babies and Toddlers and Why They Work

12 Books for Babies and Toddlers and Why They Work

Earlier this month, I Pray Today, my second book for babies and toddler was published. Today is the last day of the blog tour to celebrate.

I’ve been working on book reviews all year, though. Each month I gather up a few books I love and share them with my readers. I call it Kidlit Karma. This month I’m sharing some of my favorite books for babies and toddlers. I’m also going to dive into child development to explain why these books work.

 

Simple Art

Babies can’t see that well. Newborns’ vision is hazy – they like high contrast because it’s easy to see. You’ll often find the youngest babies staring at, say, a black object against a white background. Or a dark ceiling fan moving against a white ceiling.

By a few months old, babies vision has improved a lot but they often have a hard time understanding 2-D representations of objects.

So, books for babies and toddler often have high-contrast, easy-to-interpret pictures. For the youngest, single images on white backgrounds can be a good choice.

Book cover: RhymOceros

Rhymoceros by Janik Coat

 

Even for toddlers, simple graphics are easier for them to understand.

Book Cover: Wee Beasties: Huggy the Python Hugs Too Hard

Wee Beasties: Huggy the Python Hugs Too Hard by Ame Dyckman and Alex Griffiths

 

Faces Are a Fave

Babies love faces for pretty much the same reasons we adults do: they give us a lot of important information. We look at a person’s face to identify them and to tell what that person is feeling. Watching someone’s face while they talk also helps us figure out what they are saying. For babies who are still learning speech, it’s doubly helpful. That’s probably why babies are hardwired to stare at faces.

So books with lots of faces are a winner, especially with the younger babies and toddlers.

Book Cover: Making Faces: A First Book of Emotion

Making Faces: A First Book of Emotions

 

Babytalk and Rhyming Books

Babies love “baby talk” and it’s good for them. Forget what Great Aunt Bertha told you about only talking to your baby like a grown-up. Baby talk exaggerates the sounds of speech which makes it easier for babies to figure out the sounds they’re hearing and put those together into words. So go ahead and talk to babies in whatever way feels natural to you.

The sing-songy cadence of many rhyming books, help capitalize on this tendency. (Writers: be aware that babies are not less discerning than adults. If you write in rhyme, it needs to have PERFECT rhyme and meter.)

Book Cover: Moo Baa La La La

Moo, Baa, La La La! by Sandra Boynton

 

Repetition

Babies love repetition. They drop the same toy over and over to see if dad will still pick it up, they never tire of peekaboo, and they will gladly have you read the same book over and over and over. While at times it’s infuriating (like the 5th time the bowl of oatmeal gets dropped to the floor), it has an important purpose: babies and toddlers learn best through repetition.  Like little scientists, they’re testing if the oatmeal really drops every time. They’re also learning social information: “Will dad pick it up every time?” “Why is his mood changing as I keep dropping this?”

So many books use some kind of repetition: like the repeated phrase “Ciao!”

Book Cover: Ciao, Baby! In the Park

Ciao, Baby! In the Park by Carole Lexa Shaefer and Lauren Tobia

Or a repeated action like “besos.” (Kisses.)

Book Cover: Besos for Baby a Little Book of Kisses

Besos for Baby: A Little Book of Kisses by Jen Arena and Blanca Gomez

 

Toddlers Need to Move

Speaking of actions, getting a toddler to sit still is a lost cause. They’re busy little beings. It’s easy to read with an immobile baby – harder to keep a toddler still and focused. So many books for toddlers include some kind invitation to action to help keep them engaged with the book. 

That could be an action built right into the page, such as lifting a flap or holes designed for little fingers to poke into.

Book cover: Do Cows Meow?

Do Cows Meow? by Salina Yoon

Or it could be an invitation to action: mentioning movement is a natural invitation to move.

Book cover: Barnyard Dance!

Barnyard Dance! by Sandra Boynton

 

Sturdy Pages and Rounded Corners

Babies will put pretty much everything into their mouth. It’s a way for them to explore the world by adding the sense of taste and touch (lips and tongues are very sensitive).

Babies and toddlers are also still working on fine motor skills – such as the ability to grasp and flip a book page without tearing. They need to explore the world and practice these fine motor skills – but it can be murder on a book.

So most baby and toddler books are board books – those chunky cardboard-style book pages that can withstand chewing, banging, other forms of baby love. They even have rounded corners to prevent an eye or mouth from being poked.

Photo of book: Goodnight Jesus with corner chewed off by toddler
Photo courtesy of Summer Kinard at https://summerkinard.com/2016/11/02/goodnight-jesus-board-book-review/

 

Adults Have to Like Them Too

Since your baby will be asking to reread the same book 10,000 times (and they will), books also have to please the adult doing the reading. A newer trend is to write book series’ that focus on topics of interest to a parent (like science, great literature, etc.), but at a level simplistic enough for a baby. No, your toddler won’t be doing astrophysics calculations in their crib. They’re in it for the baby faces and birdies, but the parent can appreciate the science.

Book Cover: Baby Loves Aerospace Engineering

Baby Loves Aerospace Engineering by Ruth Spiro

Book Cover: The Wonderful Wizard of Oz: A Babylit Colors Primer

The Wonderful Wizard of Oz: A Babylit Colors Primer by Jennifer Adams and Alison Oliver

Putting It All Together

Most books will have a few of these features. Take my two books, Goodnight Jesus and I Pray Today.

Book Cover: Goodnight Jesus

Goodnight Jesus has:

  • beautiful, but simple art
  • faces on nearly every page (yay, icons!)
  • sing-songy rhymes
  • a repeated action (kissing) that little readers can do
  • sturdy pages

Book Cover: I Pray Today

I Pray Today has:

  • beautiful, simple art
  • faces on every page
  • sing-songy rhymes
  • a repeated phrase (Lord have mercy.)
  • which can be an invitation to a repeated action (saying the prayer and making a cross)
  • sturdy pages

And like a baby book on astrophysics, both of mine have bigger ideas at their core. That gives them a long lifespan for little readers and makes it interesting for the adult readers.


I hope you’ve enjoyed this week’s book tour! I’ve had fun writing on a lot of different topics on a lot of different blogs. If you missed them, you can still find them here:

Blog tour for "I PRAY TODAY"

 

I PRAY TODAY Blog Tour Day 4

Blog tour for "I PRAY TODAY"

It’s day 4 of my blog tour! If you haven’t already, check out the Day 1 post at Raising Saints, the Day 2 post on Orthodox Motherhood, and the Day 3 post on the Time Eternal blog.

Today I’m over on Charlotte Riggle’s blog talking about using children’s books for teaching kids. Check it out:

 

READ THE POST

 

Blog Tour for I Pray Today

Blog tour for "I PRAY TODAY"

Big news! A couple of weeks ago my second book, I Pray Today, was published by Ancient Faith Press. And next week I’m celebrating with a blog tour. I’ll be visiting blogs of fellow Orthodox writers and bloggers and covering a wide variety of topics:

  • Parenting
  • Teaching with children’s books
  • Prayer
  • Family life
  • Writing

Sign up now for daily emails linking to the day’s post.

You can also follow along on Twitter by following me at @aisaacswrites or look for the hashtag #ipraytoday

So where will I be?

I’m super excited, so I hope you’ll join us!

 

200+ Children’s Book Reviews

200+ Children's Book Reviews

I love reviewing connecting people with books almost as much as I love reading them. That’s one reason I review so many books here on my blog. And since I’ve started doing my Kidlit Karma project, I’m doing a lot more reviews.

Just one problem: it’s not that easy to find things here on the old blog.

So if you need, say, a nonfiction book for a tween – sure I’ve got it. …Somewhere… Something had to be done.

Now I’ve created a master page for all my book reviews. Yay!

It’s sorted in two ways:

  1. Ages and stages – this includes age ranges like baby, child, tween, teen, and adult. It also includes stages like early reading.
  2. Topics – Jump here to get a collected list of all STEM, nonfiction, diverse books, and books for writers. Within each topic they’re sorted by age to make things easy.

So, go forth and find a book to read!

 

CHECK IT OUT

Kidlit Karma Reviews: July 2018

 KidlitKarma: July 2018 book reviews

At the end of 2017, I made a pledge. I challenged myself to review good books every month in 2018, particularly books that haven’t gotten as much love as I feel they deserve. I call it Kidlit Karma because I’m aiming to spread the love for books that I love.

This month’s collection of books are all inspired by my eldest daughter, who is a struggling reader. Yes, children of writers can be struggling readers. So can bookworms. Though I was never diagnosed, I strongly suspect I’m mildly dyslexic.

Yes, writers can be dyslexic, too.

If all of this is throwing you for a loop, I recommend the book The Dyslexic Advantage. Not every struggling student is dyslexic, but for the 1 in 5 students who are dyslexic and the adults that love them, this book is revolutionary.

Cover art for THE DYSLEXIC ADVANTAGE

What if I told you there were books that are easy to read and enjoyable enough that even struggling readers will willingly devour them? 

It’s not magic, it’s graphic novels. 

So here’s the part where you start telling me that these aren’t real books, etc. Is a child reading a comic getting practice at decoding words? Are they having fun and learning to like reading so they will want to read more in the future? Yes and yes. And that will make them a better and more willing reader later.

I’m not the only one that thinks graphic novels are a boon to struggling and reluctant readers. 

Here’s why: Graphic novels tend to have more complex plots (befitting an older child) while having simpler language and smaller wordcounts appropriate to a struggling reader.

It’s about buy-in. My eldest listens to audiobook novels for kids twice her age. So she detests having to read easy readers. Something with a real plot that’s within her ability is very welcome.

Graphic novels have been the gateway for many readers. When you see a child who has struggled for years, picks up a book an inch thick and read it in 5 hours straight – there’s nothing to match their excitement at reading a “BIG” book or your pride at seeing the many hours of hard work come to fruition. And because of that success and excitement, she has read voraciously every since.

Maybe it is magic after all.

So with that in mind, here are some of our favorite graphic novels to get you started.

 

Graphic Novel: GHOSTS by Raina Telgemeier

Cover art for GHOSTS by Raina Telgemeier

Cat is not happy about having to move to a new town, but her little sister Maya is sick and they have to make the move to keep her healthy. Once they move, they discover that the town is haunted. But are the ghosts evil or friendly?

This story weaves together the kind of complex social struggles of a middle grade novel with the Mexican custom of the Day of the Dead. I present this book as a refute to the claim that graphic novels don’t involve brilliant bring-you-to-tears storytelling.

Raina Telgemeier has many more award-winning graphic novels, so make sure to check them all out.

Get GHOSTS on Amazon

 

Graphic Novel: ZITA THE SPACEGIRL series by Ben Hatke

Cover art for ZITA THE SPACEGIRL by Ben Hatke

Zita is a normal girl until her best friend is kidnapped by an intergalactic group. Now she’s on a rescue mission on a doomed planet with some unlikely companions.

My daughter got the first Zita book as a gift from her best friend. Since then, the whole family has read and reread all the books. These beloved books have earned a permanent place in our library.

Get ZITA THE SPACEGIRL on Amazon

 

Graphic Novel: PHOEBE AND HER UNICORN by Dana Simpson

Cover art for PHOEBE AND HER UNICORN by Dana Simpson

Phoebe is out skipping rocks one day and smacks a unicorn, breaking her from the spell of her own reflection. As thanks for freeing her, the unicorn grants her one wish. Phoebe’s wish: to be best friends with a unicorn. But she gets a bit more than she bargained for.

My husband was the one to discover this series. It was originally posted as a webcomic and we both fell in love with the humor and wit. We introduced it to our daughter, and that was that.

Get PHOEBE AND HER UNICORN on Amazon

 

Graphic Memoir: REAL FRIENDS by Shannon Hale

Cover art for REAL FRIENDS by Shannon Hale and LeUyen Pham

Making friends is not easy. It certainly wasn’t for shy little Shannon. And even when she had The Group to play with, she wasn’t sure they were friends worth having. Finding real friends is hard, but ultimately worth it.

This award-winning book is full of humor and heart. And though it’s set in the 70’s, the story is timeless

Get REAL FRIENDS on Amazon

 

Graphic Memoir: EL DEAFO by Cece Bell

Cover art for EL DEAFO by Cece Bell

A miraculous new invention gives young Cece the ability to hear for the first time. But school is hard enough without a bulky hearing aid. She enlists the help of her superhero persona El Deafo to take on the school and make friends.

Get EL DEAFO on Amazon

 

Graphic Novel: CATSTRONAUTS: MISSION TO THE MOON by Drew Brockington

Cover art for CATSTRONAUTS: MISSION TO THE MOON by Drew Brockington

The world has run out of electricity and it will be a permanent lights-out unless the brave Catstronauts can fix the problem.

What’s cuter than cats? How about cats in space! These books are a delight with a fun narrative, purrfect puns, and gorgeous illustrations. My kids giggled all the way through and eagerly asked for more.

Get CATSTRONAUTS on Amazon

 

6 Great Graphic Novels for Struggling Readers

Kidlit Karma Reviews: June 2018

June 2018 Kidlit Karma book reviews with Katherine Rothstein

At Katherine Rothstein Photothe end of 2017, I made a pledge. I challenged myself to review good books every month in 2018, particularly books that haven’t gotten as much love as I feel they deserve. I call it Kidlit Karma because I’m aiming to spread the love for books that I love.

If you follow me on Instagram, you’ll know that I moved into a new house earlier this month. Lucky for me my critique partner and fellow kidlit writer, Katherine Rothstein, has agreed to share her summer kidlit reading list for this month’s review. You can follow her on Twitter at @krothsteinslp2.

Take it away Katherine!

 

 


It’s officially summer!  Whether you hit the beach, lounge in your hammock, or float around the pool it’s the perfect time to read a good book. I am a speech pathologist, kidlit lover, and mommy of two. My daughter is one eager reader and enjoys reading everything from the back of a shampoo bottle to novels. My son has particularly high standards, and he prefers a read with humor and loads of action.  One thing they have in common…they both LOVE funny. Determined to keep them reading all summer, I’ve strategically created a book exchange with their friends, designed enticing book displays throughout the house, and even tucked a book or two under their pillows.  Here are a few of our favorites:

 

PICTURE BOOKS

I am a huge advocate of rhyming books for all ages but especially for children under six years old and emerging readers.  Rhyme is an essential phonological awareness skill that is necessary when learning to read.  Our brain best learns new words and information by classifying into categories. If a child can read Cat, they should also quickly learn Hat, Bat, Fat, Mat, Rat, and Sat.  Plus, rhyming books are fun to read aloud!

 

MONSTERS NEW UNDIES by Samantha Berger and Tad Carpenter

MOSNTER'S NEW UNDIES book cover

MONSTER’S NEW UNDIES is adorable!  Your tush will fall in love with this sweet little monster on a search for new undies.

Get MONSTERS NEW UNDIES on Amazon

 

FROG ON A LOG by Kes Gray and Jim Field

FROG ON A LOG book cover

Every animal has a place to sit and conveniently, each animal’s seat rhymes with that animal’s name. But Frog does not want to sit on a log. “It’s not about being comfortable,” explains the cat. “It’s about doing the right thing.”

Get FROG ON A LOG on Amazon

 

ONE BIG PAIR OF UNDERWEAR by Laura Gehl and Tom Lichtenheld

ONE BIG PAIR OF UNDERWEAR book cover

ONE BIG PAIR OF UNDERWEAR will show you that it is fun to count and share, and it all starts with one big pair of underwear.

Get ONE BIG PAIR OF UNDERWEAR on Amazon

 

EARLY READERS

Here are two that are laugh out loud funny. They teach a basic concept of opposites. They also offer fun and colorful illustrations to capture the attention of non-reading listeners.

 

STEVE AND WESLEY: THE ICE CREAM SHOP by Jennifer E. Morris

STEVE AND WESLEY: THE ICE CREAM SHOP book cover

Get STEVE AND WESLEY: THE ICE CREAM SHOP on Amazon

 

THE LONG DOG by Eric Seltzer

THE LONG DOG Book cover art

Get THE LONG DOG on Amazon

 

GRAPHIC NOVELS

These are a hit with my reluctant reader.  They have more text than early readers, deeper plots and fun illustrations to support the story.  Best of all, they are hilarious!

 

THE BAD GUYS series by Aaron Blabey

THE BAD GUYS #1 book cover art

A wolf, a piranha, a snake and a shark make up this Bad Guy team.  They plan and execute missions to support their new image of being good. Full of humor to make any kid chuckle.

Get BAD GUYS on Amazon

 

NARWHAL AND JELLY series by Ben Clanton

Book cover for NARWHAL AND JELLY: THE UNICORN OF THE SEA

Narwhal and Jelly are awesome friends with big imaginations.  This book has real fun fish facts and a waffle who battles a robot.  Yep, all that excitement packed into 65 pages!

Get NARWHAL AND JELLY: THE UNICORN OF THE SEA on Amazon

 

MIDDLE GRADE

Okay, so these two favorites do not check the funny column, but they are sure to make you smile.  And, who can resist a heart-warming story of friendship between a dog and their person?

 

CHESTER AND GUS by Cammie McGovern

Book Cover Art for CHESTER AND GUS

Chester wants to be a service dog but fails his certification.  A family adopts him in hopes that he will be a companion to their 10-year-old son with autism. Chester is lovable, smart and determined to find a way to connect with Gus and find his fit in this family.

Get CHESTER AND GUS on Amazon

 

BECAUSE OF WINN DIXIE by Kate DiCamillo

Book Cover Art for BECAUSE OF WINN DIXIE

There is a reason this book has received so much attention.  The author has a way of making the characters come to life. A brilliant story about forgiveness and friendship.

Get BECAUSE OF WINN DIXIE on Amazon

 

Have a fun summer and happy reading!

 

 

 

 

The Kidlit Karma Project

2018 Kidlit Karma Challende

Every year I spend some time thinking about what I want my life to look like in the New Year. I know that my life is better when I spend time on the things that are meaningful to me. That’s why I make it a goal to write five days a week, why I try to read a bit each day, and why I carve out time to volunteer for causes I believe in.

Quote: "We are what we repeatedly do. Excellence is not an act, but a habit." Will Durant

The little things add up. This year I wrote more than ever before. I’m on target to read 500 books for the 3rd year in a row. And I’m proud of how much the charities I support were able to achieve.

Those little habits can be just as powerful for making positive changes in the world.

My local food cooperative, Common Ground, allows you to round up your purchase to the nearest dollar and donate the change to a monthly charity. The pennies add up. Even in our small community, we routinely raise thousands of dollars each month for community charities.

Quote: "Sometimes," said Pooh, "The smallest things take up the most room in your heart." A. A. Milne

Money is easy to measure. It’s harder to quantify the small acts of kindness. A friendly smile to someone who is lonely, a willing ear for someone who is hurt, a hug for a child who is struggling – we can’t know the exact impact of these things. But these things are no less important.

Small acts of kindness, done thoughtfully and consistently, can have big impacts.

So I have been thinking: how can I harness this power of the small habits to create the kind of world I want to live in? I’ve been thinking about this in all aspects of my life. Here, I will talk about how this relates to writing.

Quote: "Be the change you want to see in the world." Mahatma Gandhi

I love to read. That’s not news, nor is it news that I am passionate about children’s literature.

Books also have powerful effects on growing minds. Children can become more compassionate just by reading books. They slip into a character’s skin and get a view of the world from a different point of view. All while exercising their minds and having a good time.

In the last few years, I have taken time to recommend many books that I truly believe in. In true fangirl fashion, when I find something I love I just can’t help but gush about it. But it’s also one small way that I can help adults and kids connect with some of the amazing stories out there.

It’s also been a way for me to highlight overlooked books. These are excellent books but, for whatever reason, they haven’t gotten as much attention as they deserve.

Quote: "No act of kindness, no matter how small, is ever wasted." Aesop

In 2018, I want to take it a step further.

A good review is like a love letter to the author and illustrator. We rarely get direct feedback on our writing. We don’t speak to the people buying our books or see how they affect the lives of our readers, so we don’t get to see their impact. Unprompted, honest support of our work can mean the world to an author.

Reviews also have tangible positive effects for authors and illustrators. Leaving reviews on Amazon and Goodreads is one of the best ways to support authors. Books with more honest, positive feedback will show up higher in search results. They are more likely to be suggested as additional purchases or “books you may like.” That translates into more sales.

I’m already reading lots of books. I’m already evangelizing about great kidlit. But I’m not taking the small next step of posting the reviews. I’m not reviewing in a way that will best help readers reach those books. And I’m not sending my love and appreciation to the authors and illustrators who worked so hard to create those books.

Quote: "A good review is like a love letter to the author."

I’m going to fix that.

The Kidlit Karma challenge: Every month in 2018, I will leave an honest, positive review on Amazon and Goodreads for a book I love.

The nitty gritty:

  • Once each calendar month I will review a book on Amazon and Goodreads.
  • I will only review books that I can honestly rate with 4 or 5 stars.
  • I will leave at least one paragraph explaining why I love this book.
  • To increase visibility, I will also crosspost my kidlit love letter on my blog and social media accounts.
  • I will use the hashtag #kidlitkarma to make postings searchable and to create buzz.
  • To have the biggest impact, I will reserve my reviews for books that have smaller numbers of reviews.

One book a month. One paragraph a month. It’s a small gift of my time that can have a big impact on others.

Here’s the thing: small acts build up more quickly when you join forces. Are you a writer, a reader, a librarian, an educator, or a lover of kidlit? You can spread the love, too.

Take the pledge!

2018 Kidlit Karma Badge

Grab this graphic and proudly post it on your blog, webpage, or social media accounts. Let others know you’re going to make your world a little better, one kid book at a time. Post in the comments with your URL, twitter handle, etc. so we can see what great books you’re reviewing each month.

 

Big List of Books to Give to Kids, 2017 edition

It’s that time again! Time for me to gush about some of the books I read this year in the hopes you will buy some.

Lucky for you, that makes gift giving easy. Books make great gifts for kids and with so many new and classic books, you can find something for every kid.

I’ve broken down the book recommendations into helpful categories. These let you find books that are appropriate for the age and reading ability of the child. If you want to get into the nitty-gritty of how children’s books are classified, check out this post.

For independent readers, this guide will help you determine if a book is appropriate.

You can also check out the lists for 2015 and 2016.

BOOKS FOR BABIES AND EXPECTANT PARENTS

Baby Loves Aerospace Engineering cover

No one is too young for a book! Nothing says love more than cuddling up in the lap of a grownup and listening to a story. And since reading to children is the number one best thing you can do to promote school success, you’re also making an investment in their future success. These books have stiff, durable pages perfect for the littlest readers.

Baby Loves Aerospace Engineering

Besos for Babies

Goodnight Jesus (You just knew that was coming, right?)

 

FIRST PICTURE BOOKS

Marta Big and Small Cover

These picture books are perfect for kids that are ready to graduate from board books. They have shorter texts (to match short attention spans) but big humor. These are a great fit for preschool through lower elementary.

Marta Big and Small

Sophie’s Squash and the sequel Sophie’s Squash Goes to School

Bitty Bot

Stick and Stone

Water Song

 

PICTURE BOOKS FOR KINDERGARTEN – ELEMENTARY

Betty Bunny Loves Chocolate Cake cover

These texts are a tad longer. Perfect for the slightly older kid that still loves picture books.

Betty Bunny Loves Chocolate Cake

The Legend of Rock Paper Scissors

Nothing Rhymes with Orange

Lady Pancake and Sir French Toast

Charlotte and the Rock

Great Now We’ve Got Barbarians

READ ALOUD CHAPTER BOOKS FOR PRESCHOOL AND KINDERGARTEN

Kids can begin listening to chapter books as young as preschool or kindergarten. These books have short chapters and pictures can help ease the transition. They’re also free of mature or scary content.

No. 1 Car Spotter

Winnie the Pooh and while you’re at it read about the true story behind the fictional bear in Finding Winnie: The True Story of the World’s Most Famous Bear

BOOKS FOR NEW READERS

Is That Wise Pig cover

These books are great for kids that are still learning to read. These are arranged from easiest to hardest. Choose the one that seems just right or a little ahead of where your reader is currently.

Is That Wise Pig? and Jan Thomas’s other books are always a big hit with my kids.

 

Ballet Cat: What’s Your Favorite Favorite?

Narwhal: Unicorn of the Sea

 

BOOKS FOR KIDS THAT DON’T LIKE TO READ

Catstronauts: Mission Moon cover

Comics and graphic novels have been the gateway to reading for many kids. Apparently, I didn’t read many graphic novels this year, but what I lack in numbers I make up for with quality. I love all the books in this series (and stalk Drew Brockington’s twitter to find out when there will be more).

Castronauts: Mission Moon

 

BIG BOOKS FOR BIG KIDS

Wonder cover

The one category where I read significantly more than in any previous year: middle grade. Middle grade is the term for upper elementary to middle school readers. I tried to thin down this list. I really did. But…. I can’t. #sorrynotsorry To help you sort through, I’ve added the genre of each but these should be taken with a (large) grain of salt.

Wonder – Realistic

Book Scavenger – Realistic/Mystery

Refugee – Modern Historical Fiction

Amina’s Voice – Realistic

The Metropolitans – Fantasy/Historical Fiction

The Mysterious Benedict Society

The Girl Who Drank the Moon – Fantasy

Escape from Mr. Lemoncello’s Library – Mystery

The First Rule of Punk – Realistic

The League of Beastly Dreadfuls – Fantasy

The Detective’s Assistant – Historical Fiction/Mystery

The Case of the Missing Moonstone – Historical Fiction/Mystery

 

YOUNG ADULT

The Hate U Give cover

There is only one book on this list, but it was the most powerful book I read all year. If you’re only going to read one YA novel all year, let it be this one.

The Hate You Give

 

TRUE STORIES FOR TRULY AWESOME KIDS

Over and Under the Snow cover

It’s a great time for people that love nonfiction. There is some terrific nonfiction out there right now. This list was just as hard to thin down as the middle grade novels. After each book, I’ve listed the age category. PB = picture book and can range from preschool to upper elementary. MG = middle elementary to middle school. YA = middle school to teen.

Over and Under The Snow – PB

I’m Trying to Love Spiders – PB

Kate Warne: Pinkerton Detective – PB

Step Right Up: How Doc and Jim Key Taught the World about Kindness – PB

Grace Hopper: Queen of Computer Code – PB

Spot the Mistake: Lands of Long Ago – PB

The Youngest Marcher: The Story of Audrey Faye Hendricks, A Young Civil Right’s Activist  – older PB

Tricky Vic: The Impossibly True Story of the Man Who Sold the Eiffel Tower – MG

Hidden Figures Young Reader’s Edition – MG or YA

Bomb: The Race to Build – And Steal – The World’s Most Dangerous Weapon – YA

Radioactive! How Irene Curie and Lise Meitner Revolutionized Science and Changed the World – YA

Blood, Bullets, and Bones: The Story of Forensic Science from Sherlock Holmes to DNA – YA

 

Still looking for inspiration? Check out these 500+ Great Kid’s Books.

Note: I get no compensation for making these recommendations. I just really, really like books.

Ultimate Gift Guide for Writers

Ultimate Gift Guide for Writers

Tis’ the season for gift giving. It’s easy to know what writers want: a five-book deal at a top publisher. Barring that, check out these suggestions to help you find gifts for the writers in your life.

FOOD ITEMS

happy coffee

Caffeinated beverages

If you hang out with writers, you will soon learn that we love our caffeinated beverages.

Most writers don’t earn a full-time income from writing and may take many years to “make it.” Most of us write early in the morning or late in the evening and subsist on caffeine. Liquid motivation can go a long way to making the writerly lifestyle work around full-time employment and other life demands.

Or maybe there’s just something about a steaming cup of coffee that’s downright magical.

In any case, find out the preferred caffeinated beverage of your writer and go to town. Options include:

  • a sampling of teas
  • a really large bag of coffee
  • membership is a tea or coffee of the month club
  • Gift card to a coffee shop or tea house

Go ahead and spring for the good stuff. A really good cup of home-brewed coffee is a nice luxury at cents to the cup.

 

I turn coffee into books mug
From: https://www.etsy.com/listing/532010884/writer-mug-green-i-turn-coffee-into?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=mug%20write&ref=sr_gallery_8

Things to put caffeinated beverages into/make them with

Again, writers like caffeinated beverages. So why not give them the gift of making a swanky cuppa at home. Or a fancy mug to hold that steaming cup of inspiration.

Consider:

If you’re feeling crafty, you can even try one of the millions* of ideas on Pinterest for decorating a coffee mug with a permanent marker.

 

Writing with chocolate

Comfort foods/drinks

Aside from caffeinated beverages, comfort foods and drinks are also a good bet.

The path to success is paved with rejection and angst. The angst of showing your work to the world. The rejection when it’s not immediately accepted as the most amazing things since Harry Potter. The angst of wondering if you will EVER get published. The angst of worry when you finally are published. It doesn’t end.

Which is why, in addition to caffeinated beverages, writers are fond of our comfort foods. Ferret out the comfort food of choice for your writer and then get creative. Common choices include:

  • Chocolate
  • Wine
  • Chocolate of the month or Wine of the month club

Like coffee and tea, a little splurge can go a long way. So skip the checkout chocolate bar and go for the Godiva.

 

STATIONARY

It is a truth universally acknowledged that a writer

must be in want of stationary

– Not Jane Austen

Ok, not as eloquent as Jane’s opening line about marriage, but it does seem true that writers love the physical tools of the trade. Even those of us that do our writing on a computer, still love the old-fashioned stuff.

 

Fountain pen

A Fancy Pen (or two)

A good pen is a wonderful thing. I like to use pens as a tangible celebration of accomplishments. Like a bottle of wine, I find the price bump from “mediocre” to “good” is not too bad. But you can easily spend upwards of “that could have been a mortgage payment.”

Here are two pens that I currently own and love but won’t break the bank:

If your writer is a true pen lover, check out these pen recommendations.

 

Notebook

Notebook or Journal

A nice notebook pairs well with those new pens you’re buying. If your favorite writer has not yet discovered the joys of Bullet Journaling, they will. Trust me. I give it a year or until they open an Instagram account, whichever comes first.

Whatever they’ll use it for, you really can’t go wrong with a nice notebook:

 

Traveler's notebook
From: https://www.etsy.com/listing/552819580/custom-travelers-notebook-cover-free?ga_order=most_relevant&ga_search_type=all&ga_view_type=gallery&ga_search_query=traveler%20notebook%20leather%20feather&ref=sr_gallery_21

Traveler’s notebook

Really want to wow your favorite writer? Let them know you believe in them and that you have impeccable taste? Well, let me introduce you to your newest obsession: traveler’s notebooks.

The concept is easy: It’s a leather cover with elastic strings that let you slip in and out different notebook inserts. All the joy of a new notebook but it just keeps going forever.

(I may be slightly obsessed.)

A traveler’s notebook is an investment. Do a favor for your favorite starving artist and make the investment for them.

You can buy from the Midori, the company that originated travelers notebooks, or you can choose one of about a million gorgeous examples from around the interwebs. For instance:

 

FUN

Ok, if you have made it this far and still haven’t found anything to give your favorite writer, try these:

Rory Story Cubes

StoryCubes

Story Cubes are a fun and simple game, perfect for your favorite writer ages 8+. It’s simple – roll the picture dice, and use the picture you roll to help build a story.

 

Stack of books

Books

I left this to last because it seems…. obvious….?

Every writer is also a reader. Period. And most of us could use help in financing our book addiction. If you don’t have a book in mind, try one of these suggestions:

The ultimate (and free) gift for any writer

Whatever you’re purchasing for your writer, there’s one thing you absolutely MUST give them: your support.

It’s simple. It’s free. But it’s the one thing most writers can’t do without.

Writing can be a lonely endeavor. It takes persistence and years of dedication. Let your writer know you support them.

Support can come in many forms:

  • understanding that your friend may need to stay in and write rather than hit the town with you
  • knowing that it’s a long process and that lack of tangible progress (like a book on Amazon) is not a sign of failure
  • gifting them with the time to write
  • realizing that this is a commitment and a passion, not a hobby

However you show it, shower your writer with support, and they will thank you every time.

My October: Back Pain, Binge Reading, and NaNoWriMo

Three weeks ago, I threw out my back. It’s not the first time and won’t be the last.

I’ve been trying to convince myself that this is like a forced vacation. A chance to catch up on reading and Netflix.

I have, indeed, done a ton of reading. According to Goodreads, I’ve clocked an average of one middle grade or young adult book every two days. That’s great for my 2017 reading challenge, but the novelty has worn off.

2017 Goodreads Books reading challenge status

So now that I can sit upright again (at least for awhile), I’ve been back to writing.

And with November on the horizon, that means NaNoWriMo.

This will be first year participating in NaNo – the challenge to write a 50,000 word novel in November. In my case, I’ll be writing a middle-grade novel, so I’m aiming for closer to 30,000 words.

Last year, I was hesitant. I had never written any fiction longer than a short story. I wasn’t sure I could maintain a story for that long. So I signed up for a NaNo account but never did much.

Then this summer, an idea hit critical mass. It had been simmering on my brain’s back burner for months before suddenly hitting a roiling boil. After some intensive brainstorming, the entire rough draft came together in about four weeks.

Rough draft is the key phrase. I knew from the get-go that I would need many rounds of revisions. I was not wrong. In my first pass of revisions, I had to backfill character motivations, add subplots, and make sure my characters were three dimensional. It’s a work in progress, but I can already see it taking shape.

I was not wrong.

In my first pass of revisions, I had to backfill character motivations, add subplots, and make sure my characters were three dimensional. It’s a work in progress, but I have hope that I’ll come out the other side with something people want to read. More importantly, I have confidence now.

So this year I’m embracing NaNo wholeheartedly. This idea has been simmering for a few months now. I’ve been itching to work on it. Now that other projects are wrapping up, I’m ready to stoke up the fire and get things going.

Plot twist: it will be my first historical fiction piece. It’s the perfect marriage of my love of story and my love of nonfiction.

I’m using the month of October to prepare (Preptober). For most NaNoers that means fleshing out characters, figuring out plot points, and the like. I’m doing all that plus having to research the real events and places where my novel is set.

Right now I’m neck-deep in research. I’m not quite drowning, but I do feel a bit seasick.

I just hope that by November, I’m back on my feet, literally.